Legislation Updates News

Queensland tightens Cert II rules

The Queensland government has confirmed details of its new mechanical services licence framework, including the need for Certificate III qualifications to perform nearly all refrigeration and air conditioning work.

The regulation incorporates feedback from the consultation period earlier this year, and confirms the goal of raising industry standards and accountability.

“The licensing framework recognises that mechanical services work involves working with dangerous elements, such as hydrocarbon refrigerants, and directly impacts the comfort, health and safety of the people who use medical gas and mechanical services systems such as air conditioning systems,” says the Decision Regulatory Impact Statement for the new mechanical services regulation.

“Further, licensing of practitioners provides consumers comfort that operators hold an appropriate technical qualification, contractors are financially sound and that the regulator can swiftly take action against individuals performing substandard work or using non-conforming building products.”

Previously, refrigeration and air conditioning work could be performed up to the value of $3,300 without a specific mechanical services licence.

From January 1, 2020 it will be illegal to carry out work of this kind, to any dollar value, without the correct refrigeration, air conditioning and mechanical services (limited or unlimited design) licence. The new regulations effectively set a Certificate III qualification (or equivalent) as the prerequisite for this work.

The one exception is single head split systems. Holders of a Certificate II qualification and a national refrigerant handling licence issued by the Australian Refrigeration Council (ARC) will still be able install a single head split air conditioning system without a QBCC licence if the value of the work is under $3,300.

As noted above, the mechanical services licensing framework will begin on January 2020.

From this date, all new entrants (finishing an apprenticeship after December 31, 2019), contractors and nominee supervisors who carry out mechanical services work will be required to hold a mechanical services licence. The laws will recognise existing licensees who perform mechanical services work under their current QBCC licences.

To help the industry transition, workers will have until December 31, 2021 to meet the licensing requirements for an occupational and site supervisor mechanical services licence. In the interim, these workers will be able to continue to perform mechanical services work without a licence as long as they are employed by an appropriately licensed contractor or a contractor to which an exemption from holding a licence or from prosecution exists under the QBCC Act.

From January 1, 2022, all individuals or companies will be required to hold a mechanical services licence.

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5 Replies to “Queensland tightens Cert II rules

  1. So when are you going to check the electrical license requirements that frigies that think and do get away with doing illegal electrical wiring work when they do installs of splits?

  2. The difference is frigies doing electrical work illegally are breaking the law and will be sorted out by the ESO if they get caught. This lets sparkies with a 2 day course install splits into your house with flammable refrigerants with no regulator other than if they do the wrong thing they can be threatened to have their ARC card taken away. Splits come pre charged with enough refrigerant for a back to back so they don’t need the ARC card anyway. If the refrigeration industry had a body like the Electrical Safety Office maybe we would have a chance for some consistency and quality in what the end users get, not just a cheep install.

  3. Ryan, many cert II guus are servicing splits they put in when there flares leak, careful kettles cant accuse the pots of being black, the whole industry is sub standard with the current licensing arrangements, we ad the tradies need to apply a collective intelligence but i fear that will never hsppen because of the money honey. Stay safe hydrocarbons are not dangerous when used and installed vorrectly, R 32 is extremely dangerous, head this information carefully.

  4. Dave (bluisher each day).
    2020 IS the good times to eliminate “Sub-standard” works, Yeah!
    Save people’s money, time and frustrations.
    I strongly believe Queensland (and all other parts of Australia) needs more decent friggies on the road asap.

    Prays to Ra.

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