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ARC re-awarded contract for licensing scheme

The Australian Refrigeration Council (ARC) has been re-awarded the contract for administration of the national refrigeration and air conditioning licence scheme, for up to nine years.

The ARC has administered the scheme since its inception in 2005. It is the body responsible for granting refrigerant handling licences (RHL) and refrigerant trading authorisations (RTA). These are compulsory for individuals and businesses working with fluorocarbon refrigerants and refrigeration and air conditioning systems.

The key objective of the scheme is to reduce the unlawful emission of ozone depleting substances and synthetic greenhouse gases through regulating how these substances are traded, stored, handled and disposed.

“The ARC is both proud and humble to continue this valuable work for the RAC industry, which has seen an increase in skills since the scheme began and where emissions reductions have resulted in significant environmental benefits,” said a media statement released today.

“In fact, controls around the handling and trade of refrigerant have resulted in over 24.37 megatonnes of CO2-e direct emissions savings.”

“With 90,000 licence holders the scheme has never been as strong and, despite an uncertain refrigerant environment, it continues to grow.”

“The refrigeration and air conditioning industry is an exciting place to be right now, and ARC is grateful for the opportunity to continue to support this great sector.”

“The RAC industry is vital to modern life,” said ARC chairman Kevin O’Shea. “Without it, surgery can’t be performed and supermarkets and laboratories won’t function properly. Our industry also leads the world in environmental stewardship, with access to cutting-edge technologies.

“And not only that, the higher skill levels within industry has directly delivered improved environmental outcomes, consumer protection and energy efficiency, through better quality services and work practices.”

One Reply to “ARC re-awarded contract for licensing scheme

  1. In God we trust, with everything else show me the data . So let’s have a look at the data to support the ARC statements below
    “In fact, controls around the handling and trade of refrigerant have resulted in over 24.37 megatonnes of CO2-e direct emissions savings.”
    “And not only that, the higher skill levels within industry has directly delivered improved environmental outcomes, consumer protection and energy efficiency, through better quality services and work practices.”
    My questions are, where does the figure of 24.37 megatonnes come from? What is its basis and how was it determined?
    What is the basis of the claim for higher skill sets? Is it a desk top audit of quals by ARC or is there a competency base for the claim?
    To be fair I to do not have any data, other than anecdotal evidence, that there has been a drop in overall skill set within the industry (and there is plenty of anecdotal comment). What would be interesting, is for the DOEE to fund some research, to collect the data and find out if the skill set has really gone up or down. Have we in fact increased emissions both direct through leakage and indirect through poor installations, incorrect gas charge, etc by lowering the qual, i.e. Cert II? Has the consumer and the environment paid the price for poor regulation policy? It is certainly not the manufacturer, he simply states “installation issue” not a “warranty issue”. It would be nice to see some real data in this area.

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